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How To Cure Your Slice By Developing A Better Golf Swing

The slice is probably one of the most common swing flaws for amateurs. It is an outside-to-inside swing path that creates side spin on the golf ball.

The side spin causes the ball to cut hard to the side, making it a very frustrating day on the course. It also seems to be one of the most difficult swing flaws to fix.

There have been hundreds of so-called golf training aids that guarantee to cure your slice. And I am sure we have all bought or thought about buying one of these gadgets after a frustrating day on the course.

Some of these golf-training aids do help you to cure your slice; others do not.

In addition to golf training aids, there have been countless articles written about the golf slice.

These articles discuss the slice in-depth and oftentimes provide “fixes” for the golf slice.

If you’ve been a golfer for any amount of time, I am sure you’ve come across at least one or two of these articles. Maybe you have even tried to implement some of the suggested fixes into your golf swing. Some of these golf swing fixes may have helped, others maybe not.

At BioForce Golf we are committed to improving your golf game. And we believe it is fundamentally a process of improving both the body and swing.

As a result, we are committed to providing you cutting-edge, researched, and PGA-Tour-proven information in the areas of golf instruction, golf fitness, and golf swing improvement.

Providing information on curing swing flaws like the slice is no different. Recently, some research from the University of North Carolina provided some interesting information on curing the slice.

A Professor from UNC and the head teaching pro from Pinehurst (venue of the 2005 US Open) performed a series of research studies on the golf swing slice.

These researchers took a group of golfers prone to slicing the golf ball through a battery of tests. These tests were to determine the best swing drills to the cure the dreaded slice.

Golf swing drills, in general, break down the golf swing into manageable parts to allow an individual to work on a specific part of the swing.

It is very difficult, as we all know, to work on “fixing” your swing when performing a full swing. It becomes too much for the brain and body to process.

It is usually best to break down the swing into parts and implement drills that work on specific parts of the swing. This allows you to simplify the process, fix the area of the swing that needs work, and eventually bring it back into the full golf swing.

Back to the research project on the slice and the swing drills. After the process of taking these amateur golfers through this battery of swing drills, the researchers found that two swing drills were of the greatest benefit.

These two drills apparently showed the greatest effect on assisting the amateur golfer prone to slicing to fix such a problem.

The first drill that showed benefit was the “toe-in drill.” This drill apparently placed the golfer in the correct positions during the swing to assist in curing the slice.

The second drill was the “split hand.” This drill helped the amateur “feel” the correct release of the club and the swing path of the club.

Again, both of these drills during this research project indicated the greatest amount of help to the amateur in the attempt to cure the slice.

What points of validity can we draw from this research project? Obviously, the “split hand” and “toe-in drill” are beneficial in assisting an amateur golfer with the slice.

Secondly, it probably indicated that there are many swing drills and possibly training aides that are not beneficial to amateur golfer.

This points to the idea that the amateur golfer must understand the swing in order to decipher what are the best drills for their swing.

Finally, it indicates that proper swing mechanics are necessary for fundamental success on the golf course.

Obviously, a poor golf swing will result in poor play on the golf course.

Implement this and other information provided by BioForce Golf to help you develop a better golf swing.

Sean

How To Build Your Golf Swing

This process is multi fold

1. Learn what YOUR neutral grip is
2. The CORRECT ball position for every club
3. The CORRECT swing shape
4. How far back YOU can take the club
5. How to play within YOUR style

You will have many options to choose from and I’ll show you how to find the ones that will work for you. Once you have all of your “components” you won’t need to experiment any longer!

WHERE TO START – GRIP AND POSTURE

While this may be obvious to some you would be surprised by the number of people that work on their swing without starting with their grip. There is only ONE neutral grip for any golfer! That grip is where YOUR arm hangs down from the shoulder socket and the angle of YOUR target side hand. It makes no difference whether you use an overlapping, interlocking, and ten-finger (baseball) grip. What IS critical is the angle the club lies in your hand.

To find YOUR neutral grip, first take your address position, but without a club, and let both arms hang downward from the shoulder sockets with NO TENSION. Most golfers will find that their target side arm hangs somewhere between the middle of the target side thigh to the inside of the thigh (depending on the width of stance and/or the width of the chest). As you look down at your target side hand pay attention to the angle it hangs. Some of you will see two knuckles of the hand, some will see three, and some may even see four. It doesn’t matter how many you see! Whatever the number, this is YOUR bodies way of telling you its natural tendency and that is the neutral angle for YOUR grip! When you place your target side hand on the club it should be at the same angle you just saw.

The club then runs diagonally from between the first and second joint of the index finger to just under the heel pad. Close the fingers and then close the hand with the heel pad on top of the shaft with the thumb to the backside of the shaft. This supplies pressure from the heel pad downward and the last three fingers exert pressure upward. Then take the lifeline of the trailing hand, located between the thumb and heel pads, and place it on the thumb of the target side hand. The lifeline against the thumb exerts the pressure here; the right forefinger should be separated, in a “triggering position”, but with no pressure. It is important to understand that the forefinger and target side thumb both be on the same side and angle of the shaft for the best support. The trailing thumb should be on the target side of the shaft. You never want the thumbs to exert any pressure. Finally, in order for the hands to work together, they must be parallel to each other.

POSTURE

Regardless of the player’s level of golf anyone can get into a posture that looks as good as any Tour Player, it takes no athletic ability to get into a proper posture! For full swing shots, other than a Driver, the inside of the heels should be as wide as the outside of the hips (for a Driver the inside of the heels as wide as the outside of the shoulders). Push the hips sockets back and up so that the pelvis is at an angle, not horizontal to the ground. As you push the hips back, and up, this will lower the chest and place the weight toward the back of the arch of the foot. Simply unlock your knees, you’ll feel a little pressure above the kneecaps, and let the arms hang limply downward from the shoulder socket. There should be NO TENSION in the arms or shoulders. Some players like to tilt their upper bodies slightly away from target as the final set-up adjustment and just because your trailing hand is lower than the target side hand this is acceptable, just don’t overdue it. Now you have YOUR grip and posture.

BALL POSITION

Ball position is the most misunderstood portion of the entire set-up. There have been many opinions about ball position. Some say one position for every shot, others say move it around depending on the club. All of the guesswork is taken out however if the golfer would set the club at address as the manufacturer designed it. All clubs, except for the Driver, are designed so that the grip end of the club is ahead of the clubhead if soled properly, this means the shaft leans forward, not vertical or backwards! If you address the ball, with say a 5 iron, and the shaft is vertical then even before you swing you’ve added loft and turned it into a seven iron! That same 5 iron is designed to have approximately 8 degrees of forward lean at address. The best players in the world, using that same 5 iron, have upwards of 15 degrees at Impact! This turns it into a 3 iron! Having said that you have the option of setting up to the ball with the shaft vertical as long as you can get into the proper Impact position…the shaft leans forward at Impact!

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER start with the shaft leaning backward! We also need to cover where the ball is located in relation to the player’s upper body, not the feet. The width of the stance changes during the course of a round but the width of the upper body does not. In addition, the target side shoulder socket is the low point of the arc and the fulcrum of the target side arm swing. Therefore the ball with a wedge will be in the center of the chest, in line with the sternum, for full swing shots, the 5 iron under the target side of the chest, and the Driver at the low point, which is the shoulder socket. This could vary depending on whether the player has exceptionally wide shoulders, but for the most part these locations will be fine for irons but the target side shoulder socket IS the LOW POINT and the Driver MUST be played at this location for straight shots! Back of this location produces a fade, with no manipulation, and forward of this location produces a draw, with no manipulation. You may see some players playing the ball back, or forward, of the target side shoulder socket but these players must either change the shoulder location at Impact, by leaning backward with the upper body, or must manipulate the clubface to hit a straight shot.

AIM and ALIGNMENT

As you take your grip you must be sure the leading edge of the clubface square. The leading edge is the edge closest to the ball. Always set the clubface first, perpendicular to the target line, then set your feet, knees, hips, eyes, and shoulders parallel to the target line.

THESE LINES ARE PARALLEL TO EACH OTHER! NEVER AIM YOUR BODY AT THE TARGET! What is the object of golf? To get the ball in the hole with the fewest strokes as possible! To aid in alignment it is imperative that you utilize a procedure called an “Intermediate Target”. The intermediate target is something between the ball and the target. It could be a piece of discolored grass, an edge of a divot, a broken tee, etc. It should be within your peripheral vision, so that you don’t have to lift your head.

MOVING THE CLUB

Because we play golf on an Inclined Plane this dictates that the club MUST move on an arc. That means the club head is only on the base on the Plane Line approximately 2 inches during the swing! It also means that the club always moves in 3 dimensions. The Backstroke dimension is backward, upward, and inward all simultaneously and On Plane. The keyword for Backstroke is “BACK”. The hands and arms control the backward and upward movement of the club. Therefore, if you did not make a shoulder turn the clubhead WOULD NOT move inside the baseline. The shoulder turn moves the club inward, NOT back and up. So if the player just turned their shoulders, without any hand or arm movement, then the club would be inside but not back and up. These two movements MUST work together to achieve the proper sequence. The trailing forearm moves the club on Plane by “tracing” the Plane. The bending, and folding of the trailing elbow also raises and lowers the club and cocks and uncocks the target side wrist. Never raise the arms and club by lifting from the shoulders sockets!

The Downstroke dimension is downward, outward, and forward. Once the player has reached full extension (follow-through) then the club moves again upward, inward, and backward. This completes the 3 dimensional swing.

LENGTH OF ARC

What does this term mean? Simply put, length of arc means how far back YOU can take the club. Some players may be able to take their hands high above their heads in the backswing while others can only get their hands to shoulder height, or less. It doesn’t matter! However far you can take the club and still maintain structure is the end of YOUR swing! You can increase your length of arc by increasing your range of motion. (see your local physical therapist for exercises to increase your range of motion).

LET’S GET STARTED

Before every shot you play there must be a sequential order of events. First of course we have to find our golf ball. Once the ball is located we then must examine the type of lie we have, the distance to the target, the shot shape desired, the wind conditions (if any), how we’re feeling that particular day, whether to play aggressively or conservatively or somewhere in between (this depends on our style), and finally choosing the correct club for the type of shot. We can’t call this a “pre-shot routine” because there is nothing routine about a golf shot! There are always factors to be decided and these factors constantly change. So we would encourage you to use the phrase “PRE-SHOT“. Pre-shot may or may not include a dress rehearsal of the swing, a practice swing. During the practice swing you’re getting a feel for the mechanics involved in hitting the shot and visualizing the ball flight.

ADDRESS AND SET-UP

Once we have gone through our pre-shot we now start the initial mechanical and mental programming procedures. Approach the ball from behind and follow this order for success. Verify these six Impact Alignments.

1. Clubface to Target Line
2. Grip to Clubface
3. Hands to Ball
4. the Plane Angle
5. Pressure Points
6. Position of the Trailing Forearm

Balance, Grip, and Plane Line MUST be verified before EVERY shot!

Now we’re ready to start the backstroke.

BACKSTROKE

Now that address is completed we can start the backstroke. As discussed earlier, this involves two separate movements. These movements are controlled from the waist up. The lower body should be moved by the upper body if the player is flexible enough, if not, then allow it to move freely in both directions.

1. The hands and arms … the vertical plane
2. The shoulders … the horizontal or inclined plane

At this point I would like to remind you that Address and Impact are NOT THE SAME! The only thing that has not changed is the ball position.

You may use any backstroke procedure you choose and there are basically three that the announcers use to describe them.

1. A one piece takeaway…Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods
2. A two piece takeaway…Ernie Els, David Duval, Karrie Webb, Anika Sorenstam
3. A three piece takeaway…Raymond Floyd, Nancy Lopez

Choose anyone you wish that feels comfortable and natural. What initiates the backstroke? Ask ten different instructors and you will get ten different answers. Some player’s feel it starts with turning the shoulders, some feel it may be the hips, and still others think and feel it’s the hands. I believe it is a combination of the hands, trailing forearm, AND shoulder turn that start the backstroke. Earlier I talked about the role of the hands, arms, and shoulders during the backstroke. They absolutely must work together and synchronous if the club is to stay on plane!

As the club starts back the clubhead must point at the base of the plane line until the clubshaft reaches parallel to the plane line and horizontal to the ground. As the club starts upward then the butt of the club must point at an extension of the base of the plane until it reaches the top of the swing. If you can’t get the clubshaft to parallel, then the butt of the club Must point to the base of the plane line. If you are one of the few that can get the shaft to parallel, then it should be parallel to the base of the plane line.

The hip sequence (how the hips move) for full swing shots is always the same. They Turn, Slide, Turn. A great majority of players think the hips slide in the backstroke (shifting weight). While this certainly is an option it eliminates creating any rotating force of the body. A better procedure would be the one described above and is the option that the majority of the world’s best players use.

How To Achieve A Full Golf Swing

A full golf swing is the desire of every golfer. You know that a full golf swing is needed to produce maximum clubhead speed and ultimately distance…but do you know how to accomplish it effectively?

You’ve probably heard your golf teaching pro say, “you’re not getting a full golf swing”, but has he told you how to get it? It’s easy to analyze, but much harder to come up with a solution…until now.

You see…a full golf swing is impossible to achieve if you do not have a higher level of golf-specific strength and flexibility. Let me say that one more time.

“A full golf swing is impossible to achieve if you do not have a higher level of golf specific strength and flexibility”.

Let’s look at these so-called “requirements”, for you to see I’m not just blowing smoke.

A full golf swing is considered a 90 degree shoulder turn, with a 45 degree hip turn. This is what we read in all the analysis’ of the golf swing.

Achieving the above physical components in your golf posture proves almost impossible for the senior golfer who has declining physical abilities.

Are you in this category?

Are you a 50-70 year old golfer who has lost a ton of yards off the tee and watched your scores get higher and higher?

If so, don’t you think if you did a simple, “in-home” golf performance program you’d see dramatic improvements in your body’s ability to make a bigger, even “full golf swing”?

To achieve this doesn’t mean hitting more balls at the range or taking more lessons. In fact, you can eliminate hitting balls altogether for a short time while you get your body back in tip-top shape.

When you do, the next time you go out to practice or play, you will be shocked!

That full golf swing you’ve dreamed about will happen without you even thinking about it. Your body will do it because it has been ‘trained’ properly.

A Quick Tip – you’ve got to focus on your rotational strength and flexibility to make a full golf swing! You can even do this sitting in your chair. Reach around the back of your chair and rotate your upper body, while leveraging your opposite arm against the chair. This is a simple, yet very effective rotational stretch you can do all day long.

You don’t need fancy, expensive equipment to improve your physical abilities, but a simple and effective program will do wonders for achieving your full golf swing.

How an Empty Box Improved My Swing

When I first started playing golf my swing was amazing—at least I thought so. The problems in my game came from the wrong clubs, the wrong golf balls and the wrong tees—essentially, all of the equipment in my bag. Once I started replacing my generic equipment with better-designed alternatives, I soon realized that those elements would only get me so far—I needed to examine my swing.

When you really think about the game of golf, the physics involved are completely awe-inspiring: a human being whacks a slightly less than two-inch ball several hundred yards across varying terrain, landing that ball inside a hole less than five inches in diameter. Many times in as few as three strokes. How is this possible? Golfing technology has played a large part in shaving strokes off the game, but ultimately the answer is the golfer’s swing.

The perfect golf swing takes advantage of the science mixed up in how a golf ball travels through the air. When the ball takes flight, several things have to happen to create a great shot: the ball has to have spin, trajectory, and speed—and all in the proper amounts relative to the shot you are trying to make. In order to control spin, your swing has to deliver the correct club-head angle. In order to convey the proper trajectory, your swing has to address the ball at the proper position. In order to provide speed, your swing has to progress through the proper series of body motions. That’s a lot going on in just one swing!

As a beginner to the game of golf, I couldn’t afford to sink a lot of money into private lessons. As a result, I spent a lot of time working on my swing by trying methods and techniques I read about in popular golf magazines. Most of these techniques utilized well-crafted graphics with a lot of arrows and talk about a “C”-shaped swing. While this was helpful in allowing me to visualize what my swing should look like, it did little to give me a practical application of that information. I spent time videotaping myself, standing in front of mirrors—not to mention hours watching professionals play on television.

But I still couldn’t find that perfect swing.

The biggest problem I had was that I had an idea of a perfect swing, but I wasn’t addressing the specifics behind what was wrong with mine. Over time, I realized that I didn’t have a terrible swing; I just had a good swing with a tendency to fade. I was satisfied with the distance I was getting (speed), I could generally control the direction of the shot (trajectory), but I had a real problem with my shot sliding to the right on me as I played off the tee.

The most common swing problem in the history of golf is the slice—an unintended movement of the ball (for a right-handed player) from left to right while the ball is in the air. As I played, my fade would progress to a slice in direct response to my building frustration. When I found out a slice is common to most golfers, it didn’t make me feel better, it made me even more frustrated—I didn’t want to be average, even in my errors!

The best part about having a swing marred by a tendency to slice is that a slice is correctable—apparently, golfers who tend to hook (unintentionally moving the ball right to left while in the air) have a much harder time correcting their swings. With a little research, I found hundreds and hundreds of products designed to assist me in straightening out my little problem. But as I said before, I didn’t want to spend the money! Lucky for me, I did have a spare empty box lid from a box of golf balls.

There are many factors involved for creating a slice, but the physics come down to the ball spinning on the wrong axis while in the air. Draw a black line around the exact center of a golf ball, and point that line at a target. If the ball spins forward exactly on a center axis, it will fly in a path directly towards the target without shifting in flight. If the ball spins even slightly off that axis—spinning slightly to the right or left, it will curve in the air. This is because the dimples in the ball create a shift in pressure around the ball, similar to the way a pitcher uses the seams to create a curve ball in baseball. The ball may begin traveling in a straight line, but if it is spinning to the right, it will ultimately move in that direction. So, the problem lies in controlling the ball’s spin. And what controls spin? The angle of the club-head when it strikes the ball.

Problem solved! But not quite. The reason my club-head wasn’t striking the ball correctly could be attributed to several possible errors—closing or opening the clubface, getting ahead or behind my hips in the late stage of my swing, an improper grip on the shaft, etc. But you address these same issues for nearly every other swing problem! I was back to square one! Only this time I was armed with the right information. I knew that my problem was spin.

I reviewed the video tape of my body in motion and I paid particular attention to the details of my swing: grip fine, hips fine, clubface open fine, follow through—not fine. It seemed I had an abnormality in my follow through. I went back to the articles I had read on correcting swings and I found a great piece of advice that ended up costing me absolutely nothing. The article encouraged me to place the lid from a box of golf balls on end about eighteen inches in front of my stance. Using tees, I secured it to the ground so that it stood up without assistance, pointing in a line towards my target. I addressed the ball with the lid to my left, and as I finished my stroke, I had to avoid hitting the box lid. Voila! No slice!

I now make it a habit of using my little trick before every round to remind myself of the correct follow through for my swing. It’s not a fancy fix, but it works, and it didn’t cost me anything for my troubles. It took a lot of analysis to make it happen, but I’m now a much happier golfer. I still slice from time to time, but at least I now know why, and what I can work on for the future. It turns out my equipment was fine, I just hadn’t really understood the owner’s manual.

Golf Swing Help With A Different Approach

Golf swing help is a thought in most amateur golfers minds on a daily basis. The never-ending search for a quick fix to your golf swing. I receive emails every day reading how golfers have tried “everything” and still haven’t improved. They have reached a state of desperation in their golf game.

Does this sound like you?

Unless you have 8 hours a day to work on your golf swing like the pros have, you will not be able to achieve that ultimate goal of consistent performance. The golf swing technique of today has become so complicated, that golfers are “paralyzed by over-analysis”.

I’ve heard some great analogies lately!

How about walking? Would we think of every biomechanical movement in every joint of our body when we walk? I don’t think so. If that happened, we’d have a lot of frustrated, immobile people out there.

The same thing holds true with golf. Having a basic understanding of how to hit the ball to your chosen target is critical, but after that, you shouldn’t have to think of 30 different things to swing the club to make this happen.

The end goal in golf is to get your ball to a target as accurately as you can, and then get it in the hole. With that being said, why are so many golfers not improving? The answer and solution are quite easy.

It’s what I say more than a dozen times every day to golfers. “It’s your body that swings the club, not the other way around”.

Your swing is only as good as your current ‘physical’ capabilities. Don’t you think that makes sense? I mean…if your body is tight (inflexible), do you think you’ll be able to make a nice full backswing with minimal tension? No way! That’s a physical impossibility.

The ONLY way to be able to achieve optimal swing mechanics with minimal effort is to improve your body’s ability to reach these physical points in the golf swing consistenly. Whether it’s a 90 degree shoulder turn, or hips slightly open with your head stationary behind the ball at impact.

It makes total sense to break down the swing fault you are currently dealing with and look at the physical requirement needed from your body. The more involved I get with improving golf performance, the more interested I’m getting in the biomechanics of the golf swing and how to improve them with the physical approach (both strength and flexibility).

I’ve seen dramatic results from members of my websites and customers of my golf improvement products, which tells me this is the way to improve your golf swing the quickest. I’ve had golfers literally tell me they wish they would have taken this approach 20 years ago!

Why not end the frustration once and for all and take a look at the ‘source’ of your swing fault?

With this approach, the last thing on your mind will be golf swing help.

Golf Swing Aids Aren’t Effective If…

Golf swing aids are rampant! Every golfer has dozens of them gathering dust in their garages or closets. How many wives have threatened a “clearing out” of these contraptions? If you are feeling me…keep reading.

Have you purchased golf swing aids only to use them once or twice and not see improvement? Isn’t this an everyday occurrence for golfers? I see and hear this all the time, and yet golfers will continue to spend hundreds of dollars by the ‘latest/greatest’ gimmick.

I don’t know if they (golfers) think they will find the “one” training aid that will change their game forever; or they are just trying to take the easy way out?

Either way, the main reason most golf swing aids don’t help is because you are not working on what’s causing your swing faults. You! Your machine (body) dictates your outcome! There’s no way around it!

What your body is capable of in that moment is the result you’ll get.

How many times have you wished you could make a bigger backswing but can’t? How often do you walk off the course with a sore back? How many times did you have a good front nine only to blow up on the back nine and shoot your normal score?

The above results were because of the “physical” issues within your body. Until you realize this and take a different approach to your golf improvement program, you’ll be a frustrated golfer for a long time.

In my opinion, there are a couple of golf swing aids that are effective when you incorporate them with your new golf training program. One is the medicus. This is a fantastic golf swing aid that gives you instant feedback. Swing it too fast or out of plane and the shaft breaks at the hinge.

Another golf swing aid I like is the weighted golf club. I swing mine everyday and boy does it loosen me up and strengthen my golf swing muscles.

Other than the above golf swing aids, there are dozens and dozens of ones that are a total waste of money. Save your money and work on you! The sooner you do, the sooner you’ll stop buying the latest, greatest golf swing aids.

The Secret to Effortless Distance With Your Golf Swing

Many times when you hear people talking about getting the most distance out of their drives or irons, you probably hear the word timing used as they talk about how to achieve this. Or, when you watch the professionals play (especially in person) the distance they achieve seems to come so effortlessly and smooth.

Although a discussion of the entire golf swing isn’t within the scope of this article, let’s talk about the timing. Timing is a word that is often bantered about when discussing the golf swing and more precisely achieving maximum distance; but timing of what? And how do I achieve it?

In a nutshell, when is comes to getting the most efficient distance out of your golf shot, the timing element is the timing of the release of the stored energy that has amassed during the process of your golf swing.

Again, for the purposes of this article, let’s fast forward just a bit to the point where you are at the top of your golf swing. At this point, if all has gone well, your left arm will straight. The relationship between the club and your wrists will be 90 degrees (wrists will be cocked). Your hips will have rotated approximately 45 degrees away from their original address position, while your shoulders have rotated more toward a 90 degree posture. Essentially, you are in somewhat of a ‘coiled’ position at the top of your backswing.

At this position, you have accumulated your stored energy. Except additional energy that will be stored and released rapidly as your shaft flexes and un-flexes, this is what you have to work with.

Now that you have all this energy stored up, how and when to release it is on of us golfers greatest conundrum. This power that you now possess is but a fleeting thing, and one must apply it at the proper moment in order to achieve the desired results.

Unfortunately, from this position at the top of the backswing is where the vast amount of golfers goes wrong; and that is the first movement they make back toward the ball is with the hands and arms. If you do this, a vast amount of your stored energy has now been released and not available to be applied to the golf ball. When you do this, you lose the angle created between your wrists and your club. You lose the angle that you have created between your shoulder and your hips. In essence, (among other things) you have begun uncoiling way to early.

Among other things, in its simplest form, this type of action is generally called swinging or releasing from the top or casting the club. Aside from grossly leaking energy from your swing this will cause and outside in swing path, and more often than not produce some severity of slice.

But, let’s stay strictly within the confines of energy and timing. If, from the top of your swing, you begin the ascent of your golf swing toward the impact zone from the ground up and maintain the aforementioned angles we discussed much longer, you’ll be well on your way to applying the energy of your swing at the proper moment (not to mention your swing path will be much more desirable).

From the top of your swing, the weight beginning to transfer from your back instep toward your front foot is what initiates the downswing. Not your hands, not your shoulders, not a spinning motion with your hips. As your weigh begins to move toward your front side, your hips will follow by beginning to release (uncoil) from the angle they had attained at the top of the swing. As the hips begin to uncoil and continue to follow the weight shift your shoulders and arms will naturally follow. Note that I said naturally. You shouldn’t be consciously firing your arms and shoulders to catch up. If you do, once again, you have just spent more of your stored energy.

As the weight shifts, the hips follow with rotation and the shoulders and arms now begin to follow suit, your wrists should still be in a ‘cocked’ position in relationship to the club. In other words, this angle is still maintained.

As your left hip clears, this imparts a tremendous amount of pressure for your upper body to catch up. And catch up it will in a big way. With you hips cleared and your belly beginning to point down the target line, you shoulders will follow through the hitting zone and finally your arms and hands will be naturally force to release in a dramatic fashion through the impact zone. As all this happens the shaft of your club will have a pretty fair amount of flex imparted on it. This is easily discernable if you look at a slow motion or still photo view of the club coming into the impact zone.

It is at this point, with the shaft flexed that the right hand begins to release (and eventually pronate) that is the culmination of releasing all this stored energy upon the golf ball with the proper timing.

In a sense, the release of the energy which entails the hips following the initiated weight shift, followed by the upper body responding to the hips uncoiling, that then begins to lead the arms and hands down the target line and through the hitting zone until finally the hands can no longer remain ‘cocked’ and they release the club naturally as a result of rapidly catching up to the rest of what the body has done.

In summary it is the arms and hands that complete the release of your stored energy NOT initiate it from the top of your swing. As you begin to bring this concept together it may actually feel to you as though your arms and hand are ‘trailing’ the rest of your swing. And in sense they are… they are waiting for the precise timing. And the great thing is, is that the physics of this will all take place quite naturally once you begin to refine the mechanics of your golf swing with your teaching professional. And with some practice you’ll soon be able to let the natural forces and physics of a good golf swing apply the proper timing to the golf ball in a smooth and effortless… longer distance manner.