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Monthly Archives: January 2018

How Your Golf Driver Swing Can Have More Power

A golf driver swing that is lacking in power has a couple of issues that need to be addressed. A golf driver swing is slightly different than your other clubs…but needs to have the same sequence of motion and body position at impact to produce more power and distance of the tee.

Most golfers swing outside their physical capabilities resulting in lost yardage and accuracy.

Has this ever happened to you?

You step up on a long par 4 or a par 5 and tell yourself you’re going to get their in two. What did you do differently on the tee to achieve it? Did you swing harder? If so, what was your result?

The first issue to cover with your golf driver swing is your range of motion, especially on your backswing. Can you make a 90 degree shoulder turn with minimal tension? Most older golfers don’t even come close. The optimal position is a 90 degree shoulder turn, with approximately 45 degrees of hip turn. This requires a high level of core strength and flexibility. Shoulder flexibility comes into play just a bit also.

If you can’t get to this position, it doesn’t matter how hard you swing…you’re still not going to maximize your power and distance with your driver. Trying to get to that position when you body cannot physically get there will only cause muscle tension, which slows clubhead speed.

Secondly, getting behind the ball and staying behind the ball at impact is critically to maximizing power and distance. This cannot be achieved with an “out-of-shape” body. It’s a physically impossibility.

Even for a fit golfer, this is sometimes hard to accomplish on a consistent basis. On the downswing, it is critical the first move is with the lower body rotating (not sliding). This rotation of the lower body, while the upper body stays back (for only a split second) takes a ton of core strength. A weaker golfer would not be able to achieve this. He/she would come over the top early with the upper body, merely because they don’t have core strength to initiate the downswing with the lower body.

So how do you achieve a golf driver swing with maximum power?

Start working on your core strength and flexibility from a rotational standpoint, with a golf weight training and golf stretching routine. Every exercise and stretch you do should incorporate rotational movements. The primary movement in the golf swing is rotational, so why wouldn’t you focus on that in your golf training program?

This is the quickest way to longer drives!

Hitting more balls with the same body and the same swing won’t get you there! You’ve got to address the physical component to achieve the mechanical efficiency with your driver.

As soon as you do, you’ll be blowing by the other players in your foursome! This IS the approach you should take with your golf driver swing.

 

Need More? This Free Video Reveals the Effortless Golf Swing Technique That Has You Hitting Longer, Straighter Shots.

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Golf Swing Improvement Secrets To Stop The Insanity

Golf swing improvement can be elusive for most golfers. I have read many articles and studies on the huge number of golfers quitting the game every year. They are tired of putting in the time, buying equipment, taking lessons, and purchasing every golf training aid on the market only to see no golf swing improvement.

You can’t fault a frustrated golfer who experiences the above and quits. Life is too short to spend 5 hours on a golf course and not enjoy it.

Let’s discuss why this happens!

First off, golf swing improvement should be approached from the inside-out. That means starting with your body. If your body has physical restrictions, you won’t ever be able to make a repeatable golf swing with any power or accuracy. It’s a physical impossibility.

You can try-and-try, but it won’t happen!

You body dictates your golfing ability. Like in any sport, raw talent is hard to come by and is only for a small percent of the athletic community.

Do you feel like you should be a better golfer? How many times have you walked off the course in disgust…knowing you should have played much better? This is a common occurrence and one that can be fixed quickly.

The right approach to golf swing improvement is one that looks at your current golf swing faults and the ‘physical’ reason behind it. I see this all the time. A golfer takes a lesson; the instructor tells the golfer what he needs to do; and the golfer can’t do it!

What a frustrating situation!

For every swing fault, there is an underlying ‘physical’ reason why it keeps happening.

Let me give you one of many examples to substantiate the above statement.

You are a slicer. That means you come “over-the-top” with your upper body. Do you want to know one of the many reasons why this happens?

Here goes!

You have poor core strength and flexibility.

If your body cannot initiate the downswing with the lower body, especially the hips rotating; it is because your core muscles are sending a message to your brain saying, “we can’t do this, so figure out another way (compensation) to get me back to the ball.”

Now the upside to this scenario.

You work on your core rotational strength and flexibility. You don’t hit more balls. You don’t add more swing thoughts to your swing. You don’t do drills at the range til your hands are bleeding. You just improve your core. That’s it!

The result?

You are able to initiate the downswing with your lower body, create and retain stored energy in your core area, and you not only stop your slice, but you add 30 yards to your drives!

That’s golf swing improvement the right way!

Again, this is just one example of a golf swing fault; and the cause and solution to eliminating it forever.

Now golf is fun again!

So when you think of playing better golf; take a new approach to your golf swing improvement.

 

Need More? This Free Video Reveals the Effortless Golf Swing Technique That Has You Hitting Longer, Straighter Shots.

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End Golf Swing Confusion Forever!

We’re in the information age, and when it comes to the golf swing, this often means information overload!

As new golfers, we start out believing that there is one right way to swing, only to find out that there are just about as many swing methods as there are instructors.  It seems that the more we learn about the golf swing, the more our minds are filled with confusing, contradictory information.

Until now, if two respected golf professionals showed you two completely different ways to swing and both told you that their way was the right way, you would have been forced to make your best guess.

Maybe you would have chosen the information from the pro who was most well known, or the one you could play the best, or the one you listened to most recently.  Regardless, with no solid way to choose one way over the other, you would be forced to go from one method to the next indefinitely.

The good news is there is now a proven way to determine which swing method is best for you.  It’s simple.  It’s easy.  And, it works every time.

The secret is to start with impact!

While there are hundreds, or maybe even thousands of different swing methods, there is only one way the club needs to be at impact to hit a desired shot.  If your club is in that position, you’ll get the results you want.  If it’s not, you won’t.  It’s that simple.

Impact is often called the moment of truth because it’s the most important aspect of your golf swing.  If you want to find your best swing, and end swing confusion forever, the secret is to relate every swing change to impact.

For example, if you want to know whether one set-up is better than another, figure out which one allows you to swing your club into the ideal position at impact in the easiest, most comfortable, most powerful way.  If you want to know whether a flatter or a more upright backswing is best, notice which way makes it easiest for you to achieve the ideal impact position.

While there are numerous swing methods, there is only one way to swing that is the, easiest, most comfortable, and most powerful way for YOU!  Trust that the swing that feels best is the right way to swing and you’ll end swing confusion forever!

Need More? This Free Video Reveals the Effortless Golf Swing Technique That Has You Hitting Longer, Straighter Shots.

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Effortless Distance With Your Golf Swing

Many times when you hear people talking about getting the most distance out of their drives or irons, you probably hear the word timing used as they talk about how to achieve this. Or, when you watch the professionals play (especially in person) the distance they achieve seems to come so effortlessly and smooth.

Although a discussion of the entire golf swing isn’t within the scope of this article, let’s talk about the timing. Timing is a word that is often bantered about when discussing the golf swing and more precisely achieving maximum distance; but timing of what? And how do I achieve it?

In a nutshell, when is comes to getting the most efficient distance out of your golf shot, the timing element is the timing of the release of the stored energy that has amassed during the process of your golf swing.

Again, for the purposes of this article, let’s fast forward just a bit to the point where you are at the top of your golf swing. At this point, if all has gone well, your left arm will straight. The relationship between the club and your wrists will be 90 degrees (wrists will be cocked). Your hips will have rotated approximately 45 degrees away from their original address position, while your shoulders have rotated more toward a 90 degree posture. Essentially, you are in somewhat of a ‘coiled’ position at the top of your back swing.

At this position, you have accumulated your stored energy. Except additional energy that will be stored and released rapidly as your shaft flexes and un-flexes, this is what you have to work with.

Now that you have all this energy stored up, how and when to release it is on of us golfers greatest conundrum. This power that you now possess is but a fleeting thing, and one must apply it at the proper moment in order to achieve the desired results.

Unfortunately, from this position at the top of the back swing is where the vast amount of golfers goes wrong; and that is the first movement they make back toward the ball is with the hands and arms. If you do this, a vast amount of your stored energy has now been released and not available to be applied to the golf ball.

When you do this, you lose the angle created between your wrists and your club. You lose the angle that you have created between your shoulder and your hips. In essence, (among other things) you have begun uncoiling way to early.

Among other things, in its simplest form, this type of action is generally called swinging or releasing from the top or casting the club. Aside from grossly leaking energy from your swing this will cause and outside in swing path, and more often than not produce some severity of slice.

But, let’s stay strictly within the confines of energy and timing. If, from the top of your swing, you begin the ascent of your golf swing toward the impact zone from the ground up and maintain the aforementioned angles we discussed much longer, you’ll be well on your way to applying the energy of your swing at the proper moment (not to mention your swing path will be much more desirable).

From the top of your swing, the weight beginning to transfer from your back instep toward your front foot is what initiates the downswing. Not your hands, not your shoulders, not a spinning motion with your hips. As your weigh begins to move toward your front side, your hips will follow by beginning to release (uncoil) from the angle they had attained at the top of the swing.

As the hips begin to uncoil and continue to follow the weight shift your shoulders and arms will naturally follow. Note that I said naturally. You shouldn’t be consciously firing your arms and shoulders to catch up. If you do, once again, you have just spent more of your stored energy.

As the weight shifts, the hips follow with rotation and the shoulders and arms now begin to follow suit, your wrists should still be in a ‘cocked’ position in relationship to the club. In other words, this angle is still maintained.

As your left hip clears, this imparts a tremendous amount of pressure for your upper body to catch up. And catch up it will in a big way. With you hips cleared and your belly beginning to point down the target line, you shoulders will follow through the hitting zone and finally your arms and hands will be naturally force to release in a dramatic fashion through the impact zone.

As all this happens the shaft of your club will have a pretty fair amount of flex imparted on it. This is easily discernable if you look at a slow motion or still photo view of the club coming into the impact zone.

It is at this point, with the shaft flexed that the right hand begins to release (and eventually pronate) that is the culmination of releasing all this stored energy upon the golf ball with the proper timing.

In a sense, the release of the energy which entails the hips following the initiated weight shift, followed by the upper body responding to the hips uncoiling, that then begins to lead the arms and hands down the target line and through the hitting zone until finally the hands can no longer remain ‘cocked’ and they release the club naturally as a result of rapidly catching up to the rest of what the body has done.

In summary it is the arms and hands that complete the release of your stored energy NOT initiate it from the top of your swing. As you begin to bring this concept together it may actually feel to you as though your arms and hand are ‘trailing’ the rest of your swing. And in sense they are… they are waiting for the precise timing.

And the great thing is, is that the physics of this will all take place quite naturally once you begin to refine the mechanics of your golf swing with your teaching professional. And with some practice you’ll soon be able to let the natural forces and physics of a good golf swing apply the proper timing to the golf ball in a smooth and effortless… longer distance manner.

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Clubhead Speed Or Power, Which Comes First In The Golf Swing?

A question for the ages in relation to the golf swing. Golfers around the world are familiar with the term clubhead speed. It is the rate at which the golf club is traveling at impact with the golf ball. Golfers are also familiar with the term power.

They know that power is directly related to clubhead speed. Knowing the connection between the two, which comes first?

Clubhead Speed and Power in the Golf Swing

Take a moment to answer the question; which comes first, clubhead speed or power?

Write down your answer and continue reading. Before we answer this question, let us do a quick review of both clubhead speed and power.

Clubhead Speed

Again, we understand that clubhead speed is the rate at which the clubhead is moving at impact with the golf ball. The development of clubhead speed is a resultant of your golf swing mechanics. It is essentially a summation of the entire process of the golf swing, beginning with address, moving through the backswing, into transition, onto the downswing, and completing with impact. The paragraph above should answer the question of which comes first; clubhead speed or power? Clubhead speed is the resultant of power development with the mechanics of the golf swing.

The next question we want to ask is about power:

How is Power Developed in the Golf Swing?

Power is a combination of two entities:

  • Golf Swing Mechanics
  • Body

Your golf swing mechanics is the efficiency at which you perform the golf swing. Essentially, the golf swing can be broken down into the stages.

These stages are:

Address, Backswing, Transition, Downswing, Impact, and Follow Through

Each of these stages within the golf swing can be performed efficiently or inefficiently. PGA Tour players tend to perform the mechanics of the golf swing very efficiently, where as the 30 handicapper performs them very inefficiently. If the mechanics within each stage of the golf swing are efficient. The creation of power and transfer of this power into clubhead speed is at a greater percentage.

On the flip side, if each stage is performed inefficiently. The amount of power developed and transferred into clubhead speed becomes a low percentage.

The first key in power development and the generation of clubhead speed is golf mechanics.

Efficient Golf Swing Mechanics = Greater Power Development and Clubhead Speed

Once we understand that efficient golf swing mechanics equals more power and clubhead speed. We can turn our attention to the “support structure” of your golf swing.

The Body

The body is what drives the golf swing. It is your skeleton, muscles, and nerves performing the mechanics of the golf swing. As a result, your body has a direct affect on how much power you generate in your golf swing.

The mechanics of golf swing requires certain levels of:

  • Flexibility
  • Balance
  • Strength
  • Endurance
  • Power

Optimal levels within these body categories allow for the possibility of performing the mechanics of the golf swing at their most efficient levels.

For example, a full shoulder in the backswing is necessary for optimal power development. In order to perform a full shoulder turn, you must have a high level of flexibility. If you are lacking the flexibility to perform a shoulder turn it will affect the amount of power you can generate. Bottom line the body is the foundation on which the golf swing is developed. If you have a weak foundation, you will have a weak golf swing.

Efficient Golf Swing Mechanics + A Strong, Flexible, and Powerful Body = Clubhead Speed

We now know clubhead speed is a product of power development in the golf swing. Power development within your golf swing is contingent upon two entities. The first entity is your golf swing mechanics. Performing the mechanics of the golf swing efficiently elicits more power. Secondly, it is the body.

Optimal power development requires certain levels of flexibility, balance, strength, endurance, and power within the body. Put these two entities together and you have the ability to generate high levels of clubhead speed within your golf swing.

Need More? This Free Video Reveals the Effortless Golf Swing Technique That Has You Hitting Longer, Straighter Shots.

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How To Improve The Spine Angle In Your Golf Swing

A common golf swing fault is a change in the spine angle during the phases of the golf swing. This single movement causes a chain reaction of compensations that alter the mechanics of your golf swing immensely. The result is usually inconsistency and a myriad of poor golf shots. Leading to frustration on the golf course and high scores.

The question that arises in my mind about this swing fault is; how can the amateur golfer improve their spine angle in the golf swing? The result would be an end to changes that oh so often hamper golfers of every level. Speaking with PGA Teaching professional Christopher Smith on this subject allowed me to get to one of the roots of this common swing fault.

According to Christopher Smith the changing of the spine angle is a common fault of the 1000’s of golfers he works with every year. A common spine angle change Christopher indicated to me was immediately at the beginning of the back swing. Often he views golfers who stand up during their back swing. This obviously changes their spine angle and not to mention posture. Resulting in a chain reaction of compensations in the golf swing.

Once Christopher demonstrated this common spine angle changed I immediately knew one of the “fixes” for it. Observation of Christopher performing this specific spine angle change of standing up during the back swing told me one important thing. This so-called swing fault of standing up may be better categorized as a flexibility fault.

Yes, a flexibility fault as I like to call it is when a golfer’s lack of flexibility impedes them from performing the mechanics of the golf swing correctly. Flexibility faults are often misdiagnosed as swing faults. As a result, the golfer dubiously works on fixing their golf swing with no avail. They continue to struggle with standing up during their back swing and never fix it or understand why it is happening. The reason is they are trying “fix” the problem with the incorrect medicine.

The correct medicine would be the implementation of golf flexibility exercises. This type of fix would allow the golfer in such a situation to perform the mechanics of the swing correctly without limitations in their body getting in the way. Sounds pretty simple when you map out in such a way.

Now getting back to the spine angle problem Christopher Smith was discussing. The standing up during the backswing can partly be described as a flexibility fault. In such a situation this is telling me the golfer has some flexibility issues limiting their ability to maintain the correct posture during the back swing. In such a situation (i.e. standing up during the backswing) we can pinpoint the flexibility fault to hip region of the body.

The hips need to be flexible and mobile to allow the golfer to maintain a fixed spine angle and rotate around it during the golf swing. If the hips are tight and inflexible the ability to do this will be compromised as in the example of standing up during the back swing.

Now looking specifically at the spine angle change of standing up we can even pin point to a greater extent the exact muscles in the hips causing this “flexibility fault”. Usually with a golfer that stands up during the backswing I find they have tight hip flexors. Hip flexors are muscles that run across the front part of the hip on both legs. These muscles when tight (i.e. inflexible) “pull” the hips underneath your spine. Making it almost impossible to maintain the spine angle set in the address position. Once you begin the back swing and suffer from “tight” hip flexors. These muscles will “pull your hips” underneath your spine, causing you to stand up. The end result is a change in your spine angle and a series of compensations in the golf swing to follow.

How do we fix this flexibility fault, get those tight hip flexors mobile, and improve your golf swing? Simply by adding a series of golf fitness flexibility exercises to your golf swing improvement program. These types of exercises take just a few minutes a day to perform. They will alleviate the tightness in your hips and in the long run improve your golf swing.

Simple yet very effective golf fitness flexibility exercises I like to use for tight hip flexors are the kneeling hip flexor stretch, standing quadriceps, and spider. All three of these golf fitness flexibility exercise focus on the hip flexors. Over time these flexibility exercises will lengthen (i.e. stretch) those tight hip flexors. Allowing you greater mobility in the hips and eliminate one of the reasons for standing up in the back swing.

So remember, it is necessary to maintain a fixed spine angle during the golf swing. If you do not a whole series of compensations will occur. The end result will be an inconsistent golf swing. One such reason for a change in your spine angle may be standing up during the back swing. This swing fault is often a flexibility fault resulting from tight hips. The implementation of golf fitness flexibility exercises in a short amount of time can fix this flexibility fault and stop you from standing up during the back swing. Resulting in a more consistent golf swing. Keep in mind the connection between your body and the golf swing, and realize it is the body swinging the golf club.

How To Get Rid Of Tension In Your Golf Swing

I think we have all been there. You are staring down a long par 4 from the tee box. The fairway is lined with trees on both sides. The landing area is “tight” and hitting 3 wood or iron is not an option, the hole is too long.

You pull out driver and tee up the ball, knowing to win the skin with your buddy you have to land this tee shot in the fairway. You take a few practice swings, address the ball, look down the fairway (it looks a little tighter than before), begin your backswing, and bang!

Your body tightens up. You hold onto the club and hook it into the tress. You think to yourself that bogey will now be a good score. You are upset at yourself and watch as your playing partner swings a smooth driver that lands the ball on the left side of the fairway.

You begin to grudgingly walk towards your ball, hoping you will find it, saying a few things under your breath, and questioning your swing mechanics.

What just happened? A situation that most of us have encountered at some time in our golfing career. We take some smooth practice swings, but when the ball is before us and we have to execute the shot we “tighten up” and hit a chunky, thin, or fat shot. We have allowed tension to seep into our golf swing. We all know that the swing is a free-flowing movement that requires your body to be loose.

Dean Reinmuth, one of Golf Digest’s top instructors, speaks extensively about this term in his book. He discusses how a swing needs to be free and flowing. This allows for the club to travel on the correct swing path and develop club head speed. Muscle tension will impede and ruin your swing.

If your muscles are tight, how will you be able to swing a club in a free-flowing manner? You will not be able to do so. If you are gripping the club with a Hulk Hogan “sleeper hold,” how are you going to swing the club freely? You can’t. If you are unable to “feel” the club head, how are you going to swing the club freely? Again, the answer is you will be unable to do so.

If you have your doubts, give it a try. Head out to the range, purchase a bucket of balls and go at it! Warm up with a few wedges and then grab your 7-iron. Hit a few half shots and let’s begin the experiment. First off, take the club and grip it as hard as you can. Now, attempt to hit the ball. What happened? I am guessing not a good outcome. One more time with our experiment, grab the 7-iron and address the ball. Now, when hitting the ball your thought should be: “I am going to hit this ball as hard as I possibly can.” Go ahead, try to hit the ball. What happened? Again, I am guessing the outcome was not good. What happened in both of these situations? You developed “tension” in your swing, and it impeded your hitting the ball solidly.

Next question: how do you develop a smooth, free-flowing swing that is tension-free? Quite a few aspects are part of this equation. Developing proper swing mechanics is part of the answer. The swing is an intricate movement that is the “blending” of a series of movements into one free-flowing movement. In order to develop a “tension-free swing” you must develop your swing. This is a process that takes time, proper instruction, and practice.

Additionally, you must develop the proper mental confidence in your game. The example in the beginning of this article is a prime example. If you are not mentally confident in your swing, what do you think is going to happen on the tee box? Your body reacts to your mind and “tightens up,” resulting in a poor swing.

How do you develop the mental side of the game? This is again done through the development of your swing, practice, and playing. As your game develops, confidence in your swing will develop. It is a give and take, so to speak. As your golf swing improves, so will the mental aspect of your game.

Finally, we must discuss the body. Yes, the body has an effect on a “tension-free” swing as well. Follow the logic, for muscles to be loose and free-flowing, they must be flexible. Being “tight” and not flexible puts you in a state of tension even before you get to the first tee! If you do not believe me, go to the gym and do 10 sets of heavy bench presses and then go to the range. See how well or poorly you hit that bucket of balls!

If your body is not flexible, you will not be able to perform the free-flowing movements of the swing. The body needs to be flexible for a tension-free swing. If you are inflexible, the ability to even develop your swing mechanics to a point where they are free-flowing will be impossible.

Bottom line is you need to develop your flexibility around your swing.

How do you go about doing this? The implementation of golf-specific flexibility exercises into a training program will do the trick.

The swing and the mind work together to develop a tension-free swing. You cannot develop one without the other. A comprehensive approach is required when developing a tension-free swing. Working only on your swing mechanics will not work if your body is inflexible. Doing only flexibility exercises will not do the trick if your swing mechanics are incorrect. And focusing only on the mental side of the game will not work if your swing is a mess, and your body is as well.

A tension-free swing allows for great shots from all over the course. Developing this type of swing takes time and effort. You must train the body, the swing, and the mind. This is the ticket to your “tension-free swing”.

How To Cure Your Slice By Developing A Better Golf Swing

The slice is probably one of the most common swing flaws for amateurs. It is an outside-to-inside swing path that creates side spin on the golf ball.

The side spin causes the ball to cut hard to the side, making it a very frustrating day on the course. It also seems to be one of the most difficult swing flaws to fix.

There have been hundreds of so-called golf training aids that guarantee to cure your slice. And I am sure we have all bought or thought about buying one of these gadgets after a frustrating day on the course.

Some of these golf-training aids do help you to cure your slice; others do not.

In addition to golf training aids, there have been countless articles written about the golf slice.

These articles discuss the slice in-depth and oftentimes provide “fixes” for the golf slice.

If you’ve been a golfer for any amount of time, I am sure you’ve come across at least one or two of these articles. Maybe you have even tried to implement some of the suggested fixes into your golf swing. Some of these golf swing fixes may have helped, others maybe not.

At BioForce Golf we are committed to improving your golf game. And we believe it is fundamentally a process of improving both the body and swing.

As a result, we are committed to providing you cutting-edge, researched, and PGA-Tour-proven information in the areas of golf instruction, golf fitness, and golf swing improvement.

Providing information on curing swing flaws like the slice is no different. Recently, some research from the University of North Carolina provided some interesting information on curing the slice.

A Professor from UNC and the head teaching pro from Pinehurst (venue of the 2005 US Open) performed a series of research studies on the golf swing slice.

These researchers took a group of golfers prone to slicing the golf ball through a battery of tests. These tests were to determine the best swing drills to the cure the dreaded slice.

Golf swing drills, in general, break down the golf swing into manageable parts to allow an individual to work on a specific part of the swing.

It is very difficult, as we all know, to work on “fixing” your swing when performing a full swing. It becomes too much for the brain and body to process.

It is usually best to break down the swing into parts and implement drills that work on specific parts of the swing. This allows you to simplify the process, fix the area of the swing that needs work, and eventually bring it back into the full golf swing.

Back to the research project on the slice and the swing drills. After the process of taking these amateur golfers through this battery of swing drills, the researchers found that two swing drills were of the greatest benefit.

These two drills apparently showed the greatest effect on assisting the amateur golfer prone to slicing to fix such a problem.

The first drill that showed benefit was the “toe-in drill.” This drill apparently placed the golfer in the correct positions during the swing to assist in curing the slice.

The second drill was the “split hand.” This drill helped the amateur “feel” the correct release of the club and the swing path of the club.

Again, both of these drills during this research project indicated the greatest amount of help to the amateur in the attempt to cure the slice.

What points of validity can we draw from this research project? Obviously, the “split hand” and “toe-in drill” are beneficial in assisting an amateur golfer with the slice.

Secondly, it probably indicated that there are many swing drills and possibly training aides that are not beneficial to amateur golfer.

This points to the idea that the amateur golfer must understand the swing in order to decipher what are the best drills for their swing.

Finally, it indicates that proper swing mechanics are necessary for fundamental success on the golf course.

Obviously, a poor golf swing will result in poor play on the golf course.

Implement this and other information provided by BioForce Golf to help you develop a better golf swing.

Sean

How To Build Your Golf Swing

This process is multi fold

1. Learn what YOUR neutral grip is
2. The CORRECT ball position for every club
3. The CORRECT swing shape
4. How far back YOU can take the club
5. How to play within YOUR style

You will have many options to choose from and I’ll show you how to find the ones that will work for you. Once you have all of your “components” you won’t need to experiment any longer!

WHERE TO START – GRIP AND POSTURE

While this may be obvious to some you would be surprised by the number of people that work on their swing without starting with their grip. There is only ONE neutral grip for any golfer! That grip is where YOUR arm hangs down from the shoulder socket and the angle of YOUR target side hand. It makes no difference whether you use an overlapping, interlocking, and ten-finger (baseball) grip. What IS critical is the angle the club lies in your hand.

To find YOUR neutral grip, first take your address position, but without a club, and let both arms hang downward from the shoulder sockets with NO TENSION. Most golfers will find that their target side arm hangs somewhere between the middle of the target side thigh to the inside of the thigh (depending on the width of stance and/or the width of the chest). As you look down at your target side hand pay attention to the angle it hangs. Some of you will see two knuckles of the hand, some will see three, and some may even see four. It doesn’t matter how many you see! Whatever the number, this is YOUR bodies way of telling you its natural tendency and that is the neutral angle for YOUR grip! When you place your target side hand on the club it should be at the same angle you just saw.

The club then runs diagonally from between the first and second joint of the index finger to just under the heel pad. Close the fingers and then close the hand with the heel pad on top of the shaft with the thumb to the backside of the shaft. This supplies pressure from the heel pad downward and the last three fingers exert pressure upward. Then take the lifeline of the trailing hand, located between the thumb and heel pads, and place it on the thumb of the target side hand. The lifeline against the thumb exerts the pressure here; the right forefinger should be separated, in a “triggering position”, but with no pressure. It is important to understand that the forefinger and target side thumb both be on the same side and angle of the shaft for the best support. The trailing thumb should be on the target side of the shaft. You never want the thumbs to exert any pressure. Finally, in order for the hands to work together, they must be parallel to each other.

POSTURE

Regardless of the player’s level of golf anyone can get into a posture that looks as good as any Tour Player, it takes no athletic ability to get into a proper posture! For full swing shots, other than a Driver, the inside of the heels should be as wide as the outside of the hips (for a Driver the inside of the heels as wide as the outside of the shoulders). Push the hips sockets back and up so that the pelvis is at an angle, not horizontal to the ground. As you push the hips back, and up, this will lower the chest and place the weight toward the back of the arch of the foot. Simply unlock your knees, you’ll feel a little pressure above the kneecaps, and let the arms hang limply downward from the shoulder socket. There should be NO TENSION in the arms or shoulders. Some players like to tilt their upper bodies slightly away from target as the final set-up adjustment and just because your trailing hand is lower than the target side hand this is acceptable, just don’t overdue it. Now you have YOUR grip and posture.

BALL POSITION

Ball position is the most misunderstood portion of the entire set-up. There have been many opinions about ball position. Some say one position for every shot, others say move it around depending on the club. All of the guesswork is taken out however if the golfer would set the club at address as the manufacturer designed it. All clubs, except for the Driver, are designed so that the grip end of the club is ahead of the clubhead if soled properly, this means the shaft leans forward, not vertical or backwards! If you address the ball, with say a 5 iron, and the shaft is vertical then even before you swing you’ve added loft and turned it into a seven iron! That same 5 iron is designed to have approximately 8 degrees of forward lean at address. The best players in the world, using that same 5 iron, have upwards of 15 degrees at Impact! This turns it into a 3 iron! Having said that you have the option of setting up to the ball with the shaft vertical as long as you can get into the proper Impact position…the shaft leans forward at Impact!

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER start with the shaft leaning backward! We also need to cover where the ball is located in relation to the player’s upper body, not the feet. The width of the stance changes during the course of a round but the width of the upper body does not. In addition, the target side shoulder socket is the low point of the arc and the fulcrum of the target side arm swing. Therefore the ball with a wedge will be in the center of the chest, in line with the sternum, for full swing shots, the 5 iron under the target side of the chest, and the Driver at the low point, which is the shoulder socket. This could vary depending on whether the player has exceptionally wide shoulders, but for the most part these locations will be fine for irons but the target side shoulder socket IS the LOW POINT and the Driver MUST be played at this location for straight shots! Back of this location produces a fade, with no manipulation, and forward of this location produces a draw, with no manipulation. You may see some players playing the ball back, or forward, of the target side shoulder socket but these players must either change the shoulder location at Impact, by leaning backward with the upper body, or must manipulate the clubface to hit a straight shot.

AIM and ALIGNMENT

As you take your grip you must be sure the leading edge of the clubface square. The leading edge is the edge closest to the ball. Always set the clubface first, perpendicular to the target line, then set your feet, knees, hips, eyes, and shoulders parallel to the target line.

THESE LINES ARE PARALLEL TO EACH OTHER! NEVER AIM YOUR BODY AT THE TARGET! What is the object of golf? To get the ball in the hole with the fewest strokes as possible! To aid in alignment it is imperative that you utilize a procedure called an “Intermediate Target”. The intermediate target is something between the ball and the target. It could be a piece of discolored grass, an edge of a divot, a broken tee, etc. It should be within your peripheral vision, so that you don’t have to lift your head.

MOVING THE CLUB

Because we play golf on an Inclined Plane this dictates that the club MUST move on an arc. That means the club head is only on the base on the Plane Line approximately 2 inches during the swing! It also means that the club always moves in 3 dimensions. The Backstroke dimension is backward, upward, and inward all simultaneously and On Plane. The keyword for Backstroke is “BACK”. The hands and arms control the backward and upward movement of the club. Therefore, if you did not make a shoulder turn the clubhead WOULD NOT move inside the baseline. The shoulder turn moves the club inward, NOT back and up. So if the player just turned their shoulders, without any hand or arm movement, then the club would be inside but not back and up. These two movements MUST work together to achieve the proper sequence. The trailing forearm moves the club on Plane by “tracing” the Plane. The bending, and folding of the trailing elbow also raises and lowers the club and cocks and uncocks the target side wrist. Never raise the arms and club by lifting from the shoulders sockets!

The Downstroke dimension is downward, outward, and forward. Once the player has reached full extension (follow-through) then the club moves again upward, inward, and backward. This completes the 3 dimensional swing.

LENGTH OF ARC

What does this term mean? Simply put, length of arc means how far back YOU can take the club. Some players may be able to take their hands high above their heads in the backswing while others can only get their hands to shoulder height, or less. It doesn’t matter! However far you can take the club and still maintain structure is the end of YOUR swing! You can increase your length of arc by increasing your range of motion. (see your local physical therapist for exercises to increase your range of motion).

LET’S GET STARTED

Before every shot you play there must be a sequential order of events. First of course we have to find our golf ball. Once the ball is located we then must examine the type of lie we have, the distance to the target, the shot shape desired, the wind conditions (if any), how we’re feeling that particular day, whether to play aggressively or conservatively or somewhere in between (this depends on our style), and finally choosing the correct club for the type of shot. We can’t call this a “pre-shot routine” because there is nothing routine about a golf shot! There are always factors to be decided and these factors constantly change. So we would encourage you to use the phrase “PRE-SHOT“. Pre-shot may or may not include a dress rehearsal of the swing, a practice swing. During the practice swing you’re getting a feel for the mechanics involved in hitting the shot and visualizing the ball flight.

ADDRESS AND SET-UP

Once we have gone through our pre-shot we now start the initial mechanical and mental programming procedures. Approach the ball from behind and follow this order for success. Verify these six Impact Alignments.

1. Clubface to Target Line
2. Grip to Clubface
3. Hands to Ball
4. the Plane Angle
5. Pressure Points
6. Position of the Trailing Forearm

Balance, Grip, and Plane Line MUST be verified before EVERY shot!

Now we’re ready to start the backstroke.

BACKSTROKE

Now that address is completed we can start the backstroke. As discussed earlier, this involves two separate movements. These movements are controlled from the waist up. The lower body should be moved by the upper body if the player is flexible enough, if not, then allow it to move freely in both directions.

1. The hands and arms … the vertical plane
2. The shoulders … the horizontal or inclined plane

At this point I would like to remind you that Address and Impact are NOT THE SAME! The only thing that has not changed is the ball position.

You may use any backstroke procedure you choose and there are basically three that the announcers use to describe them.

1. A one piece takeaway…Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods
2. A two piece takeaway…Ernie Els, David Duval, Karrie Webb, Anika Sorenstam
3. A three piece takeaway…Raymond Floyd, Nancy Lopez

Choose anyone you wish that feels comfortable and natural. What initiates the backstroke? Ask ten different instructors and you will get ten different answers. Some player’s feel it starts with turning the shoulders, some feel it may be the hips, and still others think and feel it’s the hands. I believe it is a combination of the hands, trailing forearm, AND shoulder turn that start the backstroke. Earlier I talked about the role of the hands, arms, and shoulders during the backstroke. They absolutely must work together and synchronous if the club is to stay on plane!

As the club starts back the clubhead must point at the base of the plane line until the clubshaft reaches parallel to the plane line and horizontal to the ground. As the club starts upward then the butt of the club must point at an extension of the base of the plane until it reaches the top of the swing. If you can’t get the clubshaft to parallel, then the butt of the club Must point to the base of the plane line. If you are one of the few that can get the shaft to parallel, then it should be parallel to the base of the plane line.

The hip sequence (how the hips move) for full swing shots is always the same. They Turn, Slide, Turn. A great majority of players think the hips slide in the backstroke (shifting weight). While this certainly is an option it eliminates creating any rotating force of the body. A better procedure would be the one described above and is the option that the majority of the world’s best players use.

How To Achieve A Full Golf Swing

A full golf swing is the desire of every golfer. You know that a full golf swing is needed to produce maximum clubhead speed and ultimately distance…but do you know how to accomplish it effectively?

You’ve probably heard your golf teaching pro say, “you’re not getting a full golf swing”, but has he told you how to get it? It’s easy to analyze, but much harder to come up with a solution…until now.

You see…a full golf swing is impossible to achieve if you do not have a higher level of golf-specific strength and flexibility. Let me say that one more time.

“A full golf swing is impossible to achieve if you do not have a higher level of golf specific strength and flexibility”.

Let’s look at these so-called “requirements”, for you to see I’m not just blowing smoke.

A full golf swing is considered a 90 degree shoulder turn, with a 45 degree hip turn. This is what we read in all the analysis’ of the golf swing.

Achieving the above physical components in your golf posture proves almost impossible for the senior golfer who has declining physical abilities.

Are you in this category?

Are you a 50-70 year old golfer who has lost a ton of yards off the tee and watched your scores get higher and higher?

If so, don’t you think if you did a simple, “in-home” golf performance program you’d see dramatic improvements in your body’s ability to make a bigger, even “full golf swing”?

To achieve this doesn’t mean hitting more balls at the range or taking more lessons. In fact, you can eliminate hitting balls altogether for a short time while you get your body back in tip-top shape.

When you do, the next time you go out to practice or play, you will be shocked!

That full golf swing you’ve dreamed about will happen without you even thinking about it. Your body will do it because it has been ‘trained’ properly.

A Quick Tip – you’ve got to focus on your rotational strength and flexibility to make a full golf swing! You can even do this sitting in your chair. Reach around the back of your chair and rotate your upper body, while leveraging your opposite arm against the chair. This is a simple, yet very effective rotational stretch you can do all day long.

You don’t need fancy, expensive equipment to improve your physical abilities, but a simple and effective program will do wonders for achieving your full golf swing.